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Shiny Happy Pets Issue

separation anxiety: the whole bundle of nerves Separation anxiety in our pets is heartbreaking to witness (and to say that it is frustrating to deal with may be the understatement of the century). Pets suffering from separation anxiety can destroy an entire room in the time it takes you to go to the grocery store and back, causing financial stress, emotional distress and straining the bond you share with your pet. Separation anxiety is characterized by physical or behavioral signs of distress that are displayed only when the owner is absent or when access to the owner is denied (when you’re in another room with the door closed, for instance). Because dogs are social animals, and their bond with humans is strong, the roots of canine separation anxiety are easy to imagine. When it comes to cats — whom we often think of as anti-social — they, too, can suffer from separation anxiety. In fact, the condition may be under-diagnosed in cats because they are less demonstrative about anxiety than their expressive canine cousins are. signs + symptoms Signs consistent with separation anxiety in dogs include excessive vocalization, pacing, destruction of property, urination or defecation and increased salivation. Often, dogs with the condition will be overly attached to family members at home. “Acting out” behaviors range from “the dog ate my homework” type of destruction to much more severe signs of panic, like bloodied and battered dogs who have sustained personal injury trying to escape their crates. Dogs who aren’t crated may literally destroy rooms, chewing through drywall, tearing up carpet and scratching incessantly at doors and windows. A panicked dog will stop at nothing (not even serious injury) to be reunited with his or her owner. wag expert advice the shiny happy pets issue 25


Shiny Happy Pets Issue
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