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Shiny Happy Pets Issue

by dr. ernie ward chow down One of my favorite morning rituals is offering my dogs their post-breakfast goodie. They dance in circles, smile ear-to-ear and spin their tails nearly fast wag expert advice enough to take flight! Giving our pets treats is as natural as going for a walk or stroking their fur, and it’s an important part of our special emotional bond. Here are some of my favorite tricks for making treat time healthy. portion control Whenever my dogs see me reach into the pantry or fridge, they anticipate something yummy. But remember, dogs don’t do division — a treat is a treat, no matter the size. The next time you grab a cookie or chew, break it in half. You’ll save calories while giving the same amount of love. Also, stop to ask yourself if playing, petting or praising would be better. Our pets crave our attention and interaction, and food isn’t love — love is love. Share your heart before sharing your plate! recipe: easy turkey jerky Foods rich in tryptophan, like turkey, can make pets feel content and even a little sleepy due to the calming chemicals it contains. Homemade jerky is an easy way to offer turkey as a treat to stressed pets. Preheat your oven to 200ºF. Sprinkle the turkey slices lightly with salt. Cover a baking sheet with aluminum foil and lay turkey strips side by side without touching. Leave the oven door open about an inch to allow humidity to escape as the turkey dehydrates. (You can wedge a wooden spoon in the door). Cooking time can range from two to five hours depending on the thickness of the slices. The jerky is ready when it is dry and breaks gently when bent. Freeze unused portions that won’t be eaten within a week. 1-2 lbs. raw turkey breast, thinly and evenly sliced Salt tempting treats When you’re training your pet, you’ve got to find the most incredibly appealing treat to coax him or her through each lesson. In many cases, this could mean a high-calorie reward, so you need to be strategic with treating; use the best, “highest-value” treats during training, and swap in healthier fare for your normal “good boy!” goodies (after all, as much as I’d like to, I don’t eat birthday cake every day). simple & savory I look for treats with very few ingredients, which usually means fewer additives and fewer calories. There are an increasing number of single or limited-ingredient treats now available for both cats and dogs, but I recommend simply giving green, crunchy veggies as a snack — 90% of the time, my dogs chew on carrots, broccoli, celery, green beans or asparagus. Fresh fruits are nutritious noshes, too, but be sparing in offering those high in natural sugars, such as apples and bananas, and avoid any form of added sugar in store-bought treats. Extra sugar from any source adds calories that can lead to unwanted pet poundage. 38 the shiny happy pets issue


Shiny Happy Pets Issue
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