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Shiny Happy Pets Issue

barks feature | keep calm and carry on As a complement to essential oils, flower essences can have potentially powerful moodaltering effects. Flowers have been used as medicine for centuries, but Dr. Edward Bach popularized their usage within the modern medical community in the early 1900s. Now collectively referred to as Bach Flower Remedies, these Free turn! add a perfect partner serums are safe and effective for all species of animals — but I find them particularly helpful to cats. Most flower essences take two to three weeks to produce any effects, although certain cases may experience results sooner. I typically advise pet owners to add the recommended flower essences directly to their pet’s food bowl. Rescue Remedy is one commercial combination of five flower essences used to treat stress and anxiety in pets that I often recommend. Massages make you feel good — even when you have four legs! I admit, I have no scientific evidence that therapeutic massage helps lessen anxiety or fear in pets. What I can tell you is that I’ve seen it work. Maybe it’s the endorphin release or energy transfer, or maybe it just feels good to have trusted human hands work out knotty muscles. Whatever it is, the vast majority of pets who receive massage therapy relax. It also seems to pair well with basic behavior modification training, if you train it immediately after a massage session. These pets seem more receptive and willing to learn (or maybe they just want some more rubbing!). One of the biggest scientific advances in helping calm anxious dogs and cats has been the development of synthetic pheromones. These species-specific hormones mimic the appeasing pheromones a mother secretes while nursing, triggering a relaxing response when whiffed. Pheromones are useful for easing separation anxiety, car or crate fears, noise phobias and other anxieties. I routinely douse my doctor’s coat and hands with feline facial pheromone before caring for cats at my practice. These compounds really work — sample a spray to see for yourself how pheromones can help a stressed pet (read more in Dr. Kim Smyth’s health tip, page 14). Additionally, a special milk protein, alpha-casozepine, has been shown in early research to reduce fear and ease anxiety in dogs and cats. This supplement has been available in Europe for some time and is now becoming commercially available in the United States. I’ve used this among families welcoming a two-legged baby into their draw another card work it out ad vance 3 spaces mother ’s milk is best 50 the shiny happy pets issue


Shiny Happy Pets Issue
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