Page 59

Shiny Happy Pets Issue

barks feature Ever notice how your dog expects a walk at exactly the same time every day? Or how your cat always wants to cuddle up with you just as your favorite TV show begins? It’s not just a coincidence — pets, like people, are creatures of habit. And while there are many advantages to thriving on repetition and routine (it certainly makes training easier!), the downside is that interruptions to these patterns can wreak havoc on a pet’s happiness. Change is inevitable in life — but our pets don’t know this. So how can a pet parent prepare furry friends for the unpredictable? It’s not as difficult as you might think. We asked expert animal behaviorist and veterinarian, Dr. Sophia Yin, to share some tips to help your furry friends to anticipate, adapt to, accept — and maybe even ENJOY! — a few of life’s big changes that may come their way. Getting a move on Regardless of whether or not you like an occasional change of scenery, there aren’t many transitions as big as moving from one home to another. Most dogs and cats would agree. So much of what is familiar and comforting to them, such as a favorite window or backyard tree, is instantly gone — and they don’t know why or if it will ever come back. By helping them adapt to their new home as quickly as possible, they’ll soon realize that what is most important in their lives — their relationship with you — is still very much the same. Prescription: strong doses of familiarity stick to the script: “Make sure you provide regularly scheduled walks, play sessions and quality time,” Dr. Yin advises. accentuate the positive: “Keep your pet’s mind focused on fun. Serve meals in food dispensing toys and practice positivebased games.” home 2.0: “A new home seems less scary when you bring familiar toys, pillows, dishes and litter boxes, and place them similarly to where they were in your former home.” % it’s time to call for help when… If your pet doesn’t begin to act like herself after a week or so in her new home, it may be time to think about getting professional help. Talk to your vet about any changes in mealtime habits or weight, possible self-destructive behavior (for example, licking the same spot until it is raw) and extended time spent staying hidden from the rest of the family. the shiny happy pets issue 57


Shiny Happy Pets Issue
To see the actual publication please follow the link above