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Surf and Turf Issue

wag expert advice digging up danger Dogs who dig in the dirt often don’t do it to drive you daft. Your furry friend may dig for a variety of reasons: seeking a cool place to lounge on a hot day, tr ying to escape (think digging under the fence) or pure boredom. Destroying your backyard is bad, but what’s worse are the nasty health risks your pet could unearth along the way: Pain from a previous injury, surgery or arthritis Neurologic conditions such as intervertebral disc disease (IVDD), vestibular disease and degenerative myelopathy Decreased mobility due to weakness or lost muscle mass In addition to physical benefits, pets recovering from injuries are often put on cage rest and can get a little stir crazy. Hydrotherapy allows pets to see new faces, get back on their paws and get a much-needed break from being cooped up all day. What can you expect if your veterinarian recommends hydrotherapy? Patients are considered on a case-by-case basis, but generally pets start with 30- to 40-minute sessions once or twice a week. Costs vary widely, ranging from $35 to $80 per session, but many facilities offer packages at a slightly reduced cost — a comprehensive pet insurance policy can help, too! If you think hydrot herapy can benefit your pet, talk to your vet. You might not even need to visit a referral practice or canine rehabilitation facil ity — some general practice clinics have their own water treadmills! pesky parasites: Infected animals shed intestinal parasite eggs in their stools, causing potential risks to other pets. Roundworms, hookworms and the organisms that cause toxoplasmosis in pets are some of the common culprits your dog could mistakenly dig up. frightening fungi: Digging can aerosoli ze organisms that cause fungal infections, including histoplasmosis and coccidioidomycosis (valley fever), which can be life-threatening to four-legged excavators. villainous viruses: Parvovirus and distemper can lie dormant in the soil for months before being dug up. Puppies are especially at risk of contracting these deadly diseases if they are not fully i mmunized. beastly bacteria: Some bacterial diseases lurk in the soil, ready to infect at a moment’s notice. Leptospirosis, which can cause liver and kidney failure, is found in soil surrounding standing water. Many of these pose health hazards to two-legged family members as well, so find a new way to direct your dog’s attention when his paws itch to dig in the dirt! helping H2O Post-operative rehabilitation and physical therapy go together just swimmingly — literally! Pet parents may think of hydrotherapy as something pets need only after major orthopedic surgery, but it can also help alleviate other conditions, including: the surf & turf issue 13


Surf and Turf Issue
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