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Surf and Turf Issue

wag expert advice | ruff guide: cystitis cystitis: bladder matters One of our pets’ favorite pastimes is marking their turf — but sometimes, a dribble isn’t just a dribble. Urinary spotting can be due to inflammation of the bladder, or cystitis. Our pets’ bodies are designed to wash bacteria away each time they void their bladders. Unfortunately, some situations can throw this system off, such as: • Bladder injury, including trauma, catheterization or bladder stones • Urinary retention due to neurologic problems, urinary obstruction or pain • Congenital malformations, such as a recessed vulva in female pets • Glucose in the urine, common in pets with diabetes • Urinary tract cancer In dogs, cystitis is referred to as a urinary tract infection (UTI). Simple cases occur once and are generally easy to resolve. Complicated UTIs occur because of a predisposing factor like kidney disease or diabetes. Recurrent UTIs occur as a relapse of infection or as a new infection with a different pathogen. Elsa Marie was spending a lot of time in the litter box, and she wasn’t just flinging litter for fun! “She was living in her litter box,” recalls her mom, Anne. “She seemed urgent and uncomfortable, and I saw a bit of blood in her urine.” When antibiotics didn’t help, Elsa Marie had an ultrasound that uncovered bladder stones as the cause of her cystitis. The stones were removed in surgery, and the model patient rode out recovery like a champ. She is now on a prescription diet to keep bladder stones at bay and hasn’t run into any rough waters since. 9-year-old female domestic shorthair condition: cystitis treatment: antibiotics, ultrasound, surgery amount reimbursed: $2,592 petplan protected: since April 2010 Cystitis in cats is called feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD) or feline idiopathic cystitis (FIC). Bladder stones and urinary blockage (especially in male cats) are definitive causes, but account for only about 40% of cases in cats. Two other contributing factors can be environmental stress and defects in the mucous layer of the bladder — but even with advanced diagnostics, a true cause is not found in up to 50% of cases. case study elsa 24 the surf & turf issue


Surf and Turf Issue
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