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Surf and Turf Issue

signs + symptoms Although the causes of cystitis in dogs and cats are different, the clinical signs are very much the same: • Frequent urination, with small amounts of urine produced each time • Vocalization during urination • Blood in the urine • Straining to urinate • Excessive licking of the genitals diagnosis Uncovering the cause of cystitis may be complicated, but diagnosing it usually isn’t. A urinalysis can easily show the presence of infection and is generally sufficient for diagnosing simple UTIs. For most cases of feline cystitis and for more complicated UTIs, your vet may order some additional tests. A sterile urine sample may be obtained for a urine culture, which will tell your veterinarian more about the organism causing the infection and which antibiotic is best for treatment. An X-ray can pick up the presence of bladder stones, and sometimes an ultrasound is ordered to visualize the bladder to rule out congenital malformations or tumors. case study 5-year-old female golden retriever condition: cystitis mia treatment: antibiotics, x-rays, ultrasound, surgery amount reimbursed: $6,471 petplan protected: since january 2010 Something was making Mia go berserk — she would rip around the house and beg to go outside, only to come back in and repeat the routine. Her worried mom, Jamie, took her to the vet, who diagnosed a UTI and prescribed antibiotics. Mia recovered, but she wasn’t out of deep water yet. “Three months later she had another UTI,” remarks Jamie, “and then again three months after that!” X-rays and an ultrasound revealed Mia was missing a kidney, but a recessed vulva was really to blame for her wave of issues. After surgery to correct it and prevent more infections, it’s finally smooth sailing for Mia. Bladder stones and urinary blockage (especially in male cats) are definitive causes, but account for only about 40% of feline cases. wag expert advice | ruff guide: cystitis


Surf and Turf Issue
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