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Surf and Turf Issue

wag expert advice | ruff guide: cystitis prognosis The prognosis is excellent for dogs with simple UTIs. Once an underlying cause is found for more complex cases, the prognosis is good for them, too. For cats with lower urinary tract disease, the prognosis is more complicated. Many cats will have multiple episodes of cystitis throughout their lifetimes, despite adequate treatment. But as veterinarians learn more about what causes these episodes, we also learn how best to treat them. Open and honest communication with your vet is helpful for you both, with the ultimate goal of keeping your furry friend comfortable and happy. treatment For simple UTIs, a standard course of 10 to 14 days of antibiotics is generally sufficient. For more complicated cases, antibiotics may need to be continued for a month or more. If bladder stones are to blame for recurrent infections, they will need to be treated, too. Depending on the composition of the stones, they will either be removed surgically or dissolved over time with a diet that acidifies the urine. For cats with lower urinary tract disease, treatment is not so simple. In the rare case that infection is present, antibiotics will be prescribed. For most cats, treatment centers on controlling clinical signs with pain medications, urinary acidifiers and/or anti-anxiety medications. Increasing an affected cat’s water intake or switching to wet food may also help stave off episodes. Because environmental stress is a potential trigger for cystitis in cats, keeping feline friends engaged through play, interactive toys and feeders and other environmental enrichment is key to preventing episodes. While urinary problems in our pets can be painful for them and occasionally taxing for us, vets have an arsenal of useful diagnostic tools and treatment plans to help soothe inflamed bladders and frayed nerves! FLOAT: 2.5” W x 10.5” H 26 the surf & turf issue


Surf and Turf Issue
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