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Surf and Turf Issue

Create personal space Even if your dogs are best buddies, that doesn’t mean they want to stay glued to each other’s sides constantly. Scheduling a little alone time for each dog to do some training, chew on a favorite treat or take an uninterrupted nap will go a long way toward keeping the relationship healthy. Be proactive about planning private time before the dogs become agitated with each other, and end solo sessions on a high note. This will ensure that both dogs remain relaxed and happy when their alone time is over. Rebuilding Rel ati o n sh i ps Sibling rivalry can happen among even the best of dog friends. But how should you react when playful sparring turns into a full-blown fight? wag expert advice Tip: encourage alone time. ✓ While both dogs are calm, leash one up to go for a walk and offer the other a special treat to enjoy on his own. Choose an activity each dog will find relaxing and fun. ✓ If you prefer to supervise your pets’ time together, put them in individual crates or separate rooms before you leave the house. If you're at all concerned about pets getting into squabbles when you’re not around, this takes the guesswork out of the equation. #2 break it up #1 read my body language #3 when it’s gone too far Dogs use a system of body la nguage that tells other dogs when to back off. The signals may look scar y, especially as they escalate, but they are not intended to hurt the other dog. From least to most severe, t he cues are: freezing or hovering over an objec t or piece of furniture sta ring at the dog out of the corner of their eye (often called whale eye) raising th eir lips toward the other dog loud bark s or other vo calization di rected toward the other dog punchi ng the other dog with their closed muzzle If you spot these signs, redirect your dog's energy with a walk or t rai ning session. Fortunately, 95% of dog fights can be broken up easily by simply disrupting the situation. If a fight occ urs: ✓ clap your hands and shout, “Hey!” ✓ bang something to make a loud noise ✓ grab a glass of water or your dog’s water bowl and douse the fighting dogs After a fight, separate the dogs for at least a few hours and reintroduce them in a cont rolled setting like a structured walk. While having a disagreement is normal, some dogs can take it overboard. If your dogs get i nto fights repeatedly, fights do not resolve themselves quickly or a person or other pet is injured in a fight, it’s time to call in a behavior professional. Log onto www.ccpdt.org to find a qualified trainer in your area to lend a helping paw. the surf & turf issue 33


Surf and Turf Issue
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