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Surf and Turf Issue

Breed Health Profile Flat-Coated Retriever The Flat-Coated Retriever was originally bred in mid-nineteenth century England to flush and retrieve game and waterfowl. He exhibits traits from many of his ancestor breeds, namely strength from the Newfoundland, scenting ability from setter-type dogs and a sporting, retrieving attitude from spaniels and other water dogs. A medium-sized breed, the “Flattie” will attain a height of about two feet, with a healthy weight between 70 and 80 lbs. His most notable feature is a lustrous, medium-length coat that lies flat, feathering at the ears, chest, legs and tail. This coat offers him a layer of protection against the severe weather, frigid water and tough terrain encountered on the hunt, and requires only occasional brushing and bathing, depending on lifestyle. While usually black, dark brown (“liver”) and yellow coats are not uncommon. The Flat-Coated Retriever is an ideal family companion who will guard his people and property with a forceful bark, but is naturally unaggressive. He is cheerful, eager to please and friendly with pets and children. He is generally an easy keeper, but with boisterous energy and a strong working history, he requires vigorous daily exercise. This water-lover is a great match for obedience training, agility activities and hunting trials. The Petplan Healthometer measures how healthy a particular breed is in relation to other breeds. 1 = healthiest 10 = least healthy 6 healthometer 10 0 Cataracts As in humans, a cataract refers to a clouding of the lens of the eye. Many breeds have a genetic predisposition to juvenile cataracts, i.e., occurring in young animals. These cataracts can occur as early as 6 months of age and progress to complete loss of vision by 2 years old. The good news is that most affected pets can be successfully treated with surgery. Cost of treatment: $1,500 to $3,000 per lens For more details on these and other hereditary conditions, visit gopetplan.com/condition-check Hip Dysplasia Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) is an inherited condition in which the ball and socket of the hip joint do not fit well together, resulting in a hip with increased laxity. This laxity can lead to degenerative changes and depending on the severity, may require surgical correction. Cost of treatment: $3,000 to $5,000 for surgery per hip, when uncomplicated 34 the surf & turf issue


Surf and Turf Issue
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