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Surf and Turf Issue

aysoku oru qru eexsptieorntss: answered Petplan staff veterinarian, Dr. Nina Mantione, answers some common medical questions about your pets Q: Q: Why does my Labrador eat dirt? Every time we go outside he can’t seem to help himself! This habit (excessively eating something that isn’t food) is known as pica. Your Lab could be drawn to an appetizing scent in the dirt (think grease drippings from your grill). Similarly, food smells can linger on dish towels or kitchen sponges, making them seem like tasty treats. Puppies and kittens often develop pica as a relatively normal part of growth, but if it becomes extreme or lasts into adulthood, it may signal a behavioral issue such as anxiety disorder. Pica can also indicate an underlying medical problem like gastrointestinal disease or anemia; we’re not sure why, but those can lead to compulsive dirt-eating. It’s definitely worth visiting your veterinarian for a physical exam if your pet’s habit is excessive or persistent. Is it bad to give my dog ice cubes on a hot day? I’m going to guess you saw a story on a social media site warning dog owners not to do this, right? I recently read a similar story, claiming that ice or ice water could cause a stomach spasm or cramp that would lead to bloating. Well, rest easy: It is safe to allow your dog ice on a hot day. While there is some evidence that rapid ingestion of water or food (along with gulping air) may put some dogs at risk for bloat, there is no evidence that ice cubes or ice water are dangerous to pets — in fact, they may slow down a voracious drinker! I advise you not to worry. Some vets caution that larger cubes could chip teeth, so when in doubt, break ice into smaller chunks. My own little rescue girl loves ice — she comes running when the freezer door opens! I know some people that bathe their cats — should I bathe mine? Don’t they do a fine job themselves? First I have to ask — have you ever attempted to bathe your cat? In my younger days I once had the idea to give my perfectly normal cat a bath. He was highly offended at the implication that I felt his grooming standards weren’t up to snuff! That was the day I learned that an agitated cat can defy gravity and has no qualms about climbing his person like a tree. Having said that, I know show cats that are frequently bathed (and seem to be okay with the idea!) and I sometimes recommend bathing for certain skin conditions. I apologize profusely when I do, and I generally hear that the bath happened exactly once and will never happen again! Additionally, sometimes I see chubby cats that cannot reach certain areas of their bodies and require a little assistance. In those cases, in addition to advising weight loss, I tell their owners that they can use natural, unscented baby wipes and a brush or a comb to assist in the grooming process. But overall, healthy cats don’t need to be bathed. Most are fastidious groomers and can take care of themselves. Q: 46 the surf & turf issue


Surf and Turf Issue
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