Page 58

Surf and Turf Issue

by dr. jules benson The quote at left from Cicero is over 2,000 years old and is as true now as it was then. Our dogs wait for us faithfully — even when we forget about vehicle temperature outside °F inside °F 10 mins 30 mins them or when our good judgment falters. While it’s fair to say that none of us are perfect pet parents and that we all make mistakes along the way, few missteps can be more dangerous (or more easily prevented) than allowing a pet to overheat while confined in a hot car. In far too many unfortunate cases, this results in the injury or death of a pet due to hyperthermia (aka heatstroke). in plain english & cool canine, bean in the hot seat hot cars aren’t cool In 2005, a group of researchers at Stanford University aimed to put numbers to something that most of us probably thought was common sense — cars left in the sun get hot! However, few of us were prepared for the numbers that this team came up with, most notably: how quickly a car can heat up Temperatures inside a car can increase by over 30°F within half an hour. On a pleasant 80° day, that means the inside of the car shoots up to 110° in less than 30 minutes. how incredibly hot a car can get On an 88° day, temperatures inside a car can reach almost 140° within an hour. how low the ambient temperatures can be for this to occur Even with weather in the low 70s, temperatures in a car exceeded 100° within the first 25 minutes. Researchers also found that rolling down the windows had little appreciable effect on how hot the inside of the car gets. “Dogs wait for us faithfully” – Marcus Tullius Cicero 89° 94° 99° 104° 109° 114° Leaving the windows open has little effect on the temperature inside the car. 70° 75° 80° 85° 90° 95° Even in the shade, the temperature in the car can still soar quickly to dangerous levels. 104° 109° 114° 119° 124° 129° 56 the surf & turf issue


Surf and Turf Issue
To see the actual publication please follow the link above