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Surf and Turf Issue

out and about Navigating the Nuances of Outdoor Pet-iquette Ever venture out on the hiking trails, only to have the experience turn tense after an encounter with an unleashed dog? Or have furry friends ever returned from a romp on the beach with an upset tummy? Whether your destination is a dog park, hiking trail or ocean-side oasis, there are some do’s and don’ts to make sure everyone stays safe and happy. Before you leash up to go, be sure you’ve heeded these helpful tips! Life’s a Beach by dr. deborah shores Lakeshore or seaside beaches can be a blast if you follow some simple rules to keep the outing fun for furry friends (and two-legged loungers!). enjoy sun + sand safely: citizen canine: Before leaving home, check local laws to ensure furry friends are welcome at the beach. Some may be “off-limits” to dogs during certain months or times of day, or you may be required to keep Fido on a leash. essential beachwear: Outfit your dog with a leash, well-fitted collar or harness and ID tags just in case you get separated. get watered down: Pack enough water for you and your dog, as well as a portable water bowl (which fits easily in your beach tote!) for your four-legged friend. Take frequent water breaks even on cool, cloudy days. keep it clean: Animal waste can pose a hazard to other dogs, humans and marine life — particularly hookworms and roundworms from feces — so always pick up after your pooch and dispose of waste bags in appropriate bins. clock in: Schedule your beach visit for the coolest parts of the day: early morning and evening. Pet parents of snub-nosed (brachycephalic) breeds (i.e., Pugs) need to be especially mindful since their pets risk overheating more easily. Steer clear of these beach bummers: sand spurs: This spiky vegetation can get knotted in long hair and prickle paw pads. fishing lures: Shiny and delicious-smelling to your dog, fish hooks need to be cast into a sealed tackle box or trash can to avoid painful and even life-threatening injuries. sand ingestion: Eating sand can seem silly or harmless, but can cause serious stomach upset. sea water: Some dogs love to lap it up, but drinking salt water can lead to vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration. High bacterial counts in the water can also lead to illness. “swimmer’s ear:” Ear infections are common in dogs after a trip to the beach. Ask your veterinarian to recommend a brand of ear flush solution and keep a bottle handy. Flush ears liberally after your pup takes a dip. 58 the surf & turf issue


Surf and Turf Issue
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