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Surf and Turf Issue

barks feature take a hike Clubs have sprung up all over that encourage hiking with your dog. Whether you go with a group or it’s just the two of you, check these off your list before blazing a trail: brush up on backpacking precautions: rules of the road: Research state or federal park regulations; dogs may not be allowed on trails during certain times of the year or at certain locations. have a vested interest: Be aware of local hunting seasons and carry a lightweight orange vest for yourself and your dog. The additional visibility will also help keep you from losing track of your dog if he is off-leash. chow down: Bring plenty of water and some treats for your hiking buddy. Check out the doggie backpacks made especially for dogs out on the trail — he can carry his own! get ticks off: Make sure your dog is up-to-date on tick prevention, and check your pet for ticks frequently during and after your hike. If you’re hiking in an area where Lyme disease is common (such as New England), ask your vet about vaccination. walk in the park prep for playtime: Sunny spring mornings invite us all outdoors to smell the flowers and roll in the grass. Are you ready to head to the dog park? play nicely: Just like at the beach or in any public location, be a good citizen and abide by local leash laws and dog park rules. waste not: Diseases can be spread from one dog to another if the dog park is contaminated with feces. Many parks provide bags and trash cans, but always keep a supply with you just in case. don’t wait; vaccinate! Keep your dog up-to-date to keep nose-to-nose contact safe and healthy for all. Puppies who haven’t been fully vaccinated should wait until they’re older (and protected!) to visit the park. Heads up for these hiking hazards: “sticky” situation: Dogs love to pick up sticks and other objects out on the go. Try to prevent this if you can — sticks and bones from dead animals can cause impaling injuries and choking. wild life: Snakes, porcupines, skunks, beavers, coyotes — you never know who you might come across on the trail! Properly fitted collars, harnesses and leashes can keep you in control and your dog out of harm’s way. first aid first: Hikes can lead you far from your car, so carry a basic first aid kit and download a pet first aid app so you can manage emergencies until you can get to your veterinarian. Beware these park perils: overexcitement: Teach your dog to focus on playing with you when you first arrive. A few games of fetch until your dog settles down can help prevent run-ins with other dogs. fellow four-leggers: Some dogs at the park become territorial or show aggressive tendencies, so if this happens, remove yourself and your dog as soon as possible. know Fido: Be realistic about your own dog and recognize his limitations. The dog park is not a good fit for all canine companions, especially if your dog isn’t well socialized. Take a walk solo instead! the surf & turf issue 59


Surf and Turf Issue
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