Page 15

FITS_emag

wag expert advice window of opportunity There’s nothing like a fresh breeze on a summer day, but before you throw up those sashes, double-check the security of your screen. Many cats can’t resist an open window for daydreaming, but unsecured screens can give way, allowing them to fall out. It’s actually so common for cats to fall out of windows that their injuries have a name: high-rise syndrome. Cats who fall out of windows are susceptible to facial injuries (broken teeth, fractured jaw bones), fractured limbs and chest injuries such as lung bruising and pneumothorax (air in the chest cavity). Interestingly, cats are more prone to injuries from shorter falls (less than seven stories). This is because a lower starting point doesn’t give cats enough time to turn their bodies to be ready to land on their feet. Physics also plays a role: from seven stories or higher, cats can reach terminal velocity. Once that happens, their brain sends a signal to their body to relax so that muscles and tendons can absorb the fall. If terminal velocity hasn’t been reached, their brains keep their bodies rigid throughout the fall, making for a rough landing. Your cat’s age and weight, as well as the impact surface and objects encountered during the fall (fire escapes, pipes, etc.) can all affect the severity of injury. Do your furry friend a favor and secure your screens this summer. hot pavement first aid When the summer season hits, it’s hard to resist coming out of hibernation to hit the streets with your pet. But before you set out, make sure the asphalt is not too hot for trotting. Hot pavement can burn your pet’s paw pads, causing serious damage. Most of these thermal burns tend to happen early in the season, when soft winter paws are suddenly thrust into work mode and haven’t had the chance to toughen up. If your pup has been less active all winter and you plan to get out in the warm weather, start toughening up her paw pads early. There are plenty of topically applied products on the market for this job. In addition, gradually work your dog’s way up to longer walks or runs on pavement to allow time for the paw pads to thicken. If it’s too late, and your dog is already suffering from sore, blistered and burned feet, you can treat them at home with non-adherent dressing and loose bandages, and plenty of TLC. Some burns are so severe that veterinary care will be needed. If your pet refuses to walk or has open sores on her feet, seek medical attention. Pain medications are surely in order, and antibiotics might be prescribed, too. The same advice goes for cats, of course, although they’re less likely to get in trouble over hot pavement. Their curiosity has led to paw pad burns after investigating hot stove tops, so be vigilant about your cat’s whereabouts at meal time! fun in the sun issue 13


FITS_emag
To see the actual publication please follow the link above