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USE GAMES TO TRAIN Teaching your dog a fun new trick or practicing basic obedience cues will engage his brain, tire him out and strengthen your bond (plus, you get a well-trained dog!). Trainers have a saying: a tired dog is a good dog! ✓ Need some inspiration? Explore clicker training with “101 Things To Do With a Box!" The game encourages mental and physical flexibility and builds confidence. www.clickertraining.com/node/167. click click when it’s more than just energy Having an athletic dog is one thing. But having a dog who is overstimulated in his environment and unable to regulate his emotional response to stress is another. Here are some common red flags: th e " bos s " Dogs who police visitors’ movements: Greetings are exciting, but if your dog can’t settle after 20 minutes, he may have anxiety. Look for signs that he’s not coping with stress, like charging or barking at visitors, hiding or frenzied behavior. the neu roti c Dogs who mitigate anxiety by engaging in compulsive behaviors: It may seem benign at first, but if your dog is spinning, chasing her tail, licking her feet or legs, sucking on toys or snapping at lights or imaginar y bugs, it’s time to get help. wag expert advice call a professional dog trainer! the wild card Dogs who can’t deal with the unexpected: If you have a dog who displays anxious behavior when things are not as he expects them to be, or shows fear in an unfamiliar situation (at home or on walks), he may have general anxiety. What to do? Call for backup! While exercise may be part of the plan, the situation calls for a Certified Professional Dog Trainer specializing in positive reinforcement-based behavior modification. If your dog suffers from debilitating anxiety or hur ts himself or others, a veterinar y behaviorist can help.


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