Page 53

FITS_emag

fireworks Fireworks are a summertime favorite — but your dog may not always enjoy them. Avoid events with explosives if your pup suffers from noise phobias (if he doesn’t like thunderstorms, that’s a good clue). If you do bring your pet to a festival with fireworks, hold on tight to his leash; a startled pup may try to bolt from the blast, and you don’t want to lose your dog in the crowd! music Keep an eye on your dog when your favorite band takes the stage, and remove him to a quiet area if you notice any signs of discomfort. If your pup is trembling, barking, cowering, or trying to bolt, he may not be ready to rock and roll. other dogs It’s always fun to make new friends, but remember that dogs can easily become overstimulated in a busy environment. Keep meetings with other animals brief, and if you see either pet stiffen, growl or give a hard stare or side eye, end the introduction and take a time out. puddles If a “rain or shine” event turns soggy, keep your dog from drinking from puddles. Standing water can be contaminated with insecticides and fertilizer, not to mention nasty bacteria like Leptospira and Giardia, which can cause nasty illnesses that will rain on your parade. Be sure to bring plenty of fresh drinking water instead! campfires A crackling campfire feels quintessentially summer, but can tempt curious noses and cause accidental burns. Keep furry friends a safe distance from the flames. If you’re making s’mores, be sure chocolate, wrappers and roasting sticks don’t fall into the wrong paws. Whether you’re sun worshipping or stargazing, summer fairs and festivals are fun for the whole family. With your best friend in tow, there’s more to prepare for, but with a little planning it’s easy to put safety first.


FITS_emag
To see the actual publication please follow the link above