Page 55

FITS_emag

KEEPING COOL IN THE POOL Nothing beats a backyard pool for keeping cool when the sun is blazing. But while a dip in the pool may seem safer than ocean swimming, there are still pet health woes in the H2O: Your best bud does not instinctively know how to get out of the pool, and failing to teach him can really sink your fun. Our lifeguard says: Train your dog to find the stairs so he can always exit the pool safely and NEVER let your pet play in the water unsupervised. Because moisture gets trapped in your pup’s fur, chlorine in the pool water can irritate his skin and eyes, putting him at risk for infections or skin rashes. Our lifeguard says: Be sure your pool is properly maintained, and that the level of chlorine and chemicals is minimal. Salt chlorine generators and supplemental sanitizers can help reduce chlorine use for safer swimming. Algaecides, antifreeze and clarifiers are corrosive and dangerous, and their sweet odor can be tempting to pets. If ingested, they can cause mouth ulcers and damage the GI tract with lifethreatening punctures. Our lifeguard says: Ensure all pool chemicals are properly stored and locked well out of paws’ reach. STAYING SAFE AT THE LAKE There are few places more breathtaking than a lake, but the peaceful surroundings can lure you into feeling too secure. Beware these dangers lurking beneath the surface: Lake water can be clouded and muddy, making your view of what’s in the water nearly impossible to see. Fallen tree branches and debris can pose the risk of impalement or other injuries to your dog. Our lifeguard says: As much fun as it is to watch him fly high, don’t let your dog jump off the dock into murky waters. Stagnant water sources are the perfect place for toxic algae and brain-eating amoeba to set up shop. Blue-green algae can cause skin irritations, diarrhea and vomiting, liver and nervous system damage, and can even be fatal. Our lifeguard says: If you wouldn’t want your kids swimming in the water, don’t let your canine companion wade in. Always heed local warnings and stay away from stagnant water. The Great Outdoors is home to a host of local wildlife. An unlucky pet can come nose to nose with snakes, alligators, snapping turtles and even bears. Our lifeguard says: Don’t let your dog nose around holes in riverbanks or lakeshores. To get a leg up on surviving any emergency situation, learn basic first aid and doggie CPR. No matter where you splish or splash this summer, take a few minutes to assess the situation and try to prevent accidents before you dive in. ABCs of CPR IRWAY A Open your pet’s mouth and remove any debris from the airway. REATH B Close her mouth and cover the nose with your mouth to blow air into the lungs. HEST C If the pet has no heartbeat, use one or both hands to compress the chest firmly while she lays on her side. Small dogs and cats: 20-25 breaths per minute; 100-150 compressions per minute. Medium and large dogs: 12-20 breaths per minute; 80-120 compressions per minute. fun in the sun issue 53


FITS_emag
To see the actual publication please follow the link above