what are curable medical conditions?

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what is a curable medical condition
Posted by Aliya McCullough D.V.M., M.S. on Aug 29 2019

Reading your pet insurance terms and conditions can give you an idea of how the policy works, but may leave you wondering what exactly is a “curable medical condition”? Below we answer a few common questions to take the mystery out of the fine print.

What is a curable medical condition?

A curable medical condition is any pre-existing condition or injury that can be completely cured or fixed. A medical condition is considered pre-existing if it first occurred or showed clinical signs before the start of a policy or during the policy waiting periods.

Let’s look at Callie (pictured below). This 1-year-old, adopted Wheaton Terrier-Poodle was abnormally sleepy, coughing frequently and barely eating when she arrived in her new forever home. Thanks to a physical examination, diagnostics, medications and the supportive care she received from a very dedicated veterinarian, Callie fully recovered from a scary spell of pneumonia. Today, she’s chasing balls and living her best life.

What if my pet has a curable condition before the start of a policy?

If your dog or cat has a pre-existing curable condition prior to your policy’s inception date, don’t worry, they can still benefit from pet insurance. Most pet health insurance providers do not provide coverage for pre-existing conditions, but curable conditions have an exclusionary period of 365 days.

callie the dog

In Callie’s case, her pneumonia was curable. While her health’s back to normal, Callie’s owner sought out pet health insurance to protect her from illnesses or injuries in the future. Because the pneumonia was considered a pre-existing condition, it won’t be covered for 365 days from the start of the policy, but any new illness or injury after the waiting periods will be. So, if in a few months Callie develops a new taste for socks and needs to make a sick visit to her veterinarian, the radiographs (x-rays), surgery and hospitalization would all be covered by her policy.

What happens after the curable exclusionary period?

As long as your pet has no further issues relating to the pre-existing condition during the curable exclusionary period, your four-legged friend will be eligible for coverage after the 365-day exclusionary period ends. When it came time to renew the pet insurance policy, Callie had been symptom-free for well over a year. At her annual examination, her veterinarian deemed her healthy, too! That’s what we like to hear! Hopefully, she won’t have another case of pneumonia but if she does, it’s coverable.

If you’re thinking about getting pet insurance, do your research by carefully reading the policy terms and conditions and by reaching out to the insurance provider if you have additional questions. Whether your pet is sick or healthy, it’s never too late to gain the peace of mind that a pet insurance policy brings.