Page 32

Surf and Turf Issue

Just like in people, early detection means a greater likelihood of successful treatment. The Blue Buffalo Company, the maker of fine pet foods, will match gifts up to $50,000 to the Morris Animal Foundation Unite to Fight Pet Cancer Campaign. Make a gift today at unitetofight.morrisanimalfoundation.org. “If you’re really concerned, you can put some sunscreen on your pet,” says Dr. Chon. “A better plan might be to limit sun exposure during peak UV radiation hours, especially for the sun-loving pets out there.” the skinny on skin cancer nimals get many of the same types of skin cancers that people do and, like people, some of those cancers are benign (not cancerous) and some are malignant (cancerous). With the exception of those skin tumors mentioned above, which can be caused by UV exposure, risk factors for other tumors primarily seem to be genetic. That means all pet parents should seek enlightenment on cancers that could affect furry friends. Tumors of skin origin account for approximately one-third of all tumors in dogs. In cats, hematopoietic tumors (such as lymphoma) represent approximately one-third of all feline tumors, followed closely by skin cancer. The more frequently seen types of skin tumors (both benign and malignant) in dogs include: Mast cell tumor Lipoma Histiocytoma Adenoma Squamous cell carcinoma Melanoma The more frequently seen types of skin tumors (both benign and malignant) in cats include: Basal cell tumor Mast cell tumor Squamous cell carcinoma Fibrosarcoma Because skin cancer is a relatively common cancer in our pets, it’s good to know what to look for. Just like in people, early detection means a greater likelihood of successful treatment. spotting the signs e’ve all had the experience; you’re petting your dog and feel a suspicious bump. Or you see a sore on the tip of your cat’s ear that doesn’t seem to be getting better. Pet owners are the first and most important watchdogs in detecting skin abnormalities. Groomers are a second line of defense, as they often get a better look at hard-to-see areas including anal sacs, inner ears and underarms. At your pet’s annual veterinary checkup, your veterinarian should always give your pet a thorough skin exam as well. what to look for f you do notice lumps, bumps or growths on your pet’s skin, take note of the following to report to your vet: Is the area of concern black, red or pink in color, or is it colorless? Is it bleeding? Does it smell? Is it growing quickly, or has it remained the same size? Is it attached to underlying structures or does it feel loose? Is it soft or hard? Just seeing or feeling a growth won’t tell you much. Your veterinarian will need to do some testing to determine if your pet simply has a benign growth, like a lipoma, or something that needs more attention. 30 the surf & turf issue


Surf and Turf Issue
To see the actual publication please follow the link above