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Surf and Turf Issue

scrubbing bubbles making bath time fun for furry friends Whether it’s to freshen up fur or ditch the dirt, there are times your best friend needs a bath. Some pets take to water like rubber duckies, but for others bath time is a real soap opera. To make a splash your furry friends will find fun while achieving a squeaky clean, follow these tips. How often you should bathe your cat or dog is difficult to say. Dogs love dirt and need regular washing, but there’s a balance between keeping clean and preserving natural oils to keep skin healthy. A good guideline is once a month, but it depends on your dog’s skin and coat type. Dogs with water-resistant coats should go under the faucet less frequently, while those with greasy skin or who need a prescription shampoo should be bathed more often. Before taking the plunge, get up close and purr-sonal with your pet to look for reddened skin, grease, scaliness, scabs or sore patches that could indicate a skin infection. Also, run your hands over his body to by dr. pippa elliott search for new lumps or check the size of those you know about. If you find anything out of the ordinary, lose the loofah and call the family vet to schedule a checkup. (Don’t bathe your pet before the appointment, as it could wash away the evidence.) If his skin looks healthy, comb through his coat and decide which shampoo to use. Pick a pet shampoo that is specially formulated for dogs or cats; human shampoos are the wrong pH and can be too harsh for an animal’s skin. Also, as much as you wish Rover smelled like a rose, avoid products with artificial fragrances, which can irritate a pet’s sensitive skin. For pets with smooth, glossy fur, soap up with a mild shampoo. Try an oatmeal-based product that is soothing and gentle. Dry, dull or harsh coats call for moisturizing shampoo. Aloe-based products will provide extra moisture. If you have a pet with a dense or wiry coat, use a finishing spritz of coat conditioner after the main event. a hairy question lather matters Finding a groomer If a home spa isn’t for you, ask your vet or a trusted friend for a recommendation for a groomer. Visit the groomer to check that the facilities are clean and ask how they cope with stressed animals. Perhaps introduce your pet and see if they have a rapport — after all, animals are an excellent judge of character!


Surf and Turf Issue
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